6 Part-Time Summer Jobs To Boost Your Bank Account

6 Part-Time Summer Jobs To Boost Your Bank Account

Lots of Americans had summer jobs when they were teenagers or when they were in college. It was nice to have a little extra cash around for fun summer activities.

However, just because you’ve graduated from college and have a full-time job doesn’t mean that you can’t take a couple of extra hours per week and get a summer job at any age.

By taking a little bit of time in the evenings or on the weekend, you can help pay for that summer vacation, send your children to summer camp, pay off a credit card balance or even just get a head start on saving for the expenses of the holiday season.

Here’s a look at six part-time jobs you could get this summer and how much supplemental income money you could expect from just five hours of extra work per week for three months.

Related Link: 9 Financial Steps Every College Graduate Should Take Immediately

1. Medical Transcriber: $1,030

Medical transcribers simply listen to audio recordings that physicians and other medical professionals make and type the information into medical reports. Some labs are very flexible with weekend or after-work hours.

2. Fast Food Worker: $544

It may not be the best pay or the best job, but there’s a good chance that there are plenty of local places that are hiring and that would work with you by scheduling hours around your full-time job.

3. Tutor: $750

The higher your level of expertise and education, the more money you could potentially make by being a private tutor. You can schedule tutoring sessions at your own convenience, and helping a struggling student can be a rewarding experience as well.

4. Grounds Maintenance: $810

If you ever made money by mowing lawns when you were a kid, this job is the adult version. In addition to making some extra cash, this type of outdoor work could also help get you daily exercise and outdoor time as well.

5. Pizza Delivery: $657

If you have a car and a couple of extra hours on weekend nights, you can pocket a few hundred extra dollars over the summer. Remember, the size of the tips you can anticipate depends on the area in which you work.

6. Uber Driver: $870

Another option for people with their own vehicles is being an Uber driver. Right on its website, Uber says working as a driver is “an excellent way to work a few hours during nights or weekends to save up money.”

The ideas listed above are creative, fun and potentially rewarding summer jobs that can earn any American some significant supplemental income. At the same time, they are simply a sampling of hundreds of similar part-time jobs that are out there for people that are willing to hunt for them.

By working one extra hour every weeknight, five hours on a Saturday, or a couple of hours two to three days a week, you can end the summer with $1,000 or more in your pocket and a new life experience on you resume.

Posted-In: Part-Time Jobs summer summer break UberEducation Personal Finance General Best of Benzinga

Arbitration clause helps buyers, sellers avoid legal battles

Answer: No, you are not obligated to agree to arbitration simply because it’s in the preprinted offer form. Most offer forms today include such a boilerplate clause, but you can strike it by crossing out the paragraph, initialing by its side, and then having the sellers put their own initials next to yours.

Ms. Cheap Shops 50% off Sale at Textile Fabrics – NewsChannel 5 …

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A 27-year-old with $181000 in the bank explains the simple calculation that keeps him from overspending


pocketwatch wealthy suit
He saves 65% of his
take-home pay.

Jeff J Mitchell / Getty
Images


At just 27 years old, the blogger behind the Money Wizard — who goes by
the pen name Sean online — has banked more than $181,000.
He’s
on a mission to retire early
, at age 37.

Sean saves 65% of his take-home pay — he earns $80,000 a year as
a financial analyst — and still manages to
travel frequently
.

“Probably what’s most driving me [to retire early] — I just want
freedom,” he told Business Insider. “So many people get caught up
in the race of materialism, thinking that next house or next car
is what will make them happy. I think happiness comes from
freedom. I just want to be able to do what I want, without
financial worry.”

He saves automatically
each month, putting his money into a 401(k), IRA, and index
funds. “Saving off the top,” he said, is the best strategy for
socking away money because you don’t miss the cash if you don’t
see it in the first place.

Ultimately, Sean’s philosophy for building wealth is based on
calculating the value
of his time
, in dollars.

“Understanding that, at its core, money is a unit of exchange for
time … every purchase costs me time — the most limited resource
we have,” he said. Before buying something, Sean often calculates
the true cost of the purchase, in terms of the time it took him
to earn the amount, to put it into perspective.

“If I buy a $30 dinner, that
dinner is paid for in after-tax dollars and is subject to sales
tax. If I’m in the 25% tax bracket and the dinner is subject to a
10% meal tax, that $30 dinner costs nearly $45. After considering
the time spent working to earn $45, is the fancy dinner still
worth it?” he said.

Another example, which Sean wrote about
in a blog post last year
, is the temptation many of us have
to spend frivolously on trinkets or souvenirs in gift
shops.

“It’s a fast transaction, and you didn’t even notice the $25 dent
in your wallet,”  he wrote.
Now consider the time spent at work, on calls, and
dealing with difficult customers that earned you the nearly $34,
which finally whittled down to the $25 in your pocket today. Is
it still worth it? Lord help you if that gadget happens to be a
$1,000 MacBook…”

Sean calls this “no-thought spending,” and he says it can
easily take over your bank account if you’re not careful.

“This exercise can be applied for nearly every item that scrolls
across your mind’s never-ending conveyor belt of impulse purchase
ideas,” he said. “When the buying decision is framed in the
quantifiable days, months, and years of life an item truly costs,
the Money Wizard thinks twice.”

Ms. Cheap Shops 50% off Sale at Textile Fabrics

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Talk of the Town features regular segments with experts in the law, pediatrics, and animal health. We also have experts in health, fitness,…

District shows balanced budget but lean times ahead

Though the Moorpark Unified Board of Trustees expects the district will end the 2017- 18 school year in the black, it was made clear at its June 20 meeting that school leaders will have to be frugal in the coming years to stay financially sound.

On Tuesday, the board voted 4-0 to approve MUSD’s 2017-18 budget. Trustee Nathan Sweet was absent from the meeting.

Most of the budget’s details had been discussed at a hearing held the week before, where newly hired assistant superintendent of business services Anne Gibson spent an hour laying out the district’s financial projections over the next three years, as well as ideas on how MUSD can save money in the future. MUSD’s projected general fund revenue for 2017-18 will be about $ 60 million, the largest share going toward staff benefits.

Though total expenditures

for the year will be about $62 million, Gibson said the district will be able to end the 2017-18 year with reserves of approximately $2 million by carrying over the 2016-17 ending fund balance of $3.8 million.

MUSD will see some cost savings and be able to stay out of the red thanks in part to the 35 teachers who chose to take advantage of an early-retirement package this year, Gibson said. That move could save the district about $2.3 million over a five-year period.

What’s more, she said, the district is expected to have $1 million in redevelopment monies by July and may receive an additional $1.2 million in redevelopment funds by next summer.

In another move to cut costs, the district opted not to rehire for a few positions, including one certificated nurse, one custodian and a purchasing director.

Argos delivery driver rewarded with just £10 gift card | Daily Mail …

A single father who came up with an idea to save Argos more than £1.5 million was rewarded with just a £10 gift voucher.

Mark Heslehurst, of Middlesbrough, suggested to bosses that Argos van drivers only use Sainsbury’s petrol stations to refuel after the supermarket chain took over the catalogue business in September.

Speaking to the MailOnline, Mr Heslehurst, a van driver for Argos, said after staff were emailed by Sainsbury’s chairman, Mike Coupe, to suggest ideas to help the firm cut costs, he pitched several ideas in an email.

Mark Heslehurst suggested to bosses that van drivers only use Sainsbury's petrol stations to refuel

Mark Heslehurst suggested to bosses that van drivers only use Sainsbury’s petrol stations to refuel

The father-of-one claims he was subsequently invited to present his ideas to fast track delivery team at Argos’ HQ in Milton Keynes.

Mr Heslehurst, 52, said: ‘Some ideas they liked, some they discussed and some they rebuffed, which was fair enough. One which stuck was Argos vans using only Sainsbury’s petrol stations to refuel.

‘The Chairman of Argos wrote to me thanking me for my ideas. Five months later, a circular [email] was sent to all Argos workers informing them of the new policy to only fill up at Sainsbury’s petrol stations, as some but not all forecourts are 24 hours.’

Mr Heslehurst wrote to a senior manager at Sainsbury’s, who informed him a large number of vehicles were now only filling up at Sainsbury’s and this had saved the business around £1.5 million.

The idea was picked up and Mr Heslehurst was given just a £10 gift voucher as a thank you, but a manager at the firm said savings would be 'about £1.5 million'

The idea was picked up and Mr Heslehurst was given just a £10 gift voucher as a thank you, but a manager at the firm said savings would be ‘about £1.5 million’

He said he was later called into the office and given a voucher of £10 as a token of thanks.

Mr Heslehurst added: ‘While the voucher was a nice gesture I was a bit irked by that because I’m a part time driver on minimum wage and I’m aware how much money the idea has saved them.’

Prior to working as a van driver, Mr Heslehurst ran his own business school, which had branches in the UK and France.

But after losing a contract with a major supplier for his business, which accounted for 70 per cent of the turnover, his marriage broke down and his wife, who is French Cambodian, left the country with their son for Cambodia.

Mr Heslehurst decided to step down from the business to try bring his son, Edward, now 14, home.

For legal reasons, he was unable to fight for custody through the courts and launched a campaign to raise awareness.

He gathered 100,000 signatures from his community and walked from Middlesbrough to London with the petition to submit it to Downing Street.

Unfortunately, nothing came of his efforts, however, two years ago, his ex-wife contacted him and he was able to bring Edward home to Britain.

Mr Heslehurst decided to take a part-time job so he could spend more time with Edward. However, as Edward is now older, Mr Heslehurst wants to ‘apply himself’ more.

Argos staff were asked to suggest cost-saving ideas to Sainsbury's chairman Mike Coupe after the takeover 

Argos staff were asked to suggest cost-saving ideas to Sainsbury’s chairman Mike Coupe after the takeover 

He said: ‘I live in a one bedroom flat and have spent the last six years sleeping on a camp bed so my son can have his own room. He has everything that he could possibly want, but I would like to have a higher position to provide for him and I better.

‘I was kind of hoping there would be some advancement career-wise, so I am little disappointed.

‘I really do like my job – I enjoy working there and have met some brilliant people, I just thought there was a discrepancy between £1.5 million and £10.’ 

An Argos spokesperson said: ‘We always appreciate colleague feedback. On this occasion we already had the measures which were suggested in place.’ 

The MailOnline has contacted Sainsbury’s for comment.

Last year, Sainsbury’s bought Argos for £1.4billion.

At the time, it said it wanted to create a ‘food and non-food retailer of choice’ and was hoping to draw in more shoppers by using Argos’ click and collect service.

Sainsbury’s added it wants to bolster its financial services operations and offer a ‘wider range of customer-centric services’, including credit cards, loans and insurance.

Mr Coupe said last year: ‘Our customers want us to offer more choice and for that choice to be faster than ever, driven by the rise of mobile phone and digital technology. It will enhance both businesses in the way customers respond.’

On Monday, The Daily Mail revealed Sainsbury’s is aiming to purchase convenience chain Nisa for £130m.

Argos delivery driver, 52, on £7.50-an-hour whose idea saved the company £1.5million is rewarded with a £10 gift …

A single father who came up with an idea to save Argos more than £1.5 million was rewarded with just a £10 gift voucher.

Mark Heslehurst, of Middlesbrough, suggested to bosses that Argos van drivers only use Sainsbury’s petrol stations to refuel after the supermarket chain took over the catalogue business in September.

Speaking to the MailOnline, Mr Heslehurst, a van driver for Argos, said after staff were emailed by Sainsbury’s chairman, Mike Coupe, to suggest ideas to help the firm cut costs, he pitched several ideas in an email.

Mark Heslehurst suggested to bosses that van drivers only use Sainsbury's petrol stations to refuel

Mark Heslehurst suggested to bosses that van drivers only use Sainsbury’s petrol stations to refuel

The father-of-one claims he was subsequently invited to present his ideas to fast track delivery team at Argos’ HQ in Milton Keynes.

Mr Heslehurst, 52, said: ‘Some ideas they liked, some they discussed and some they rebuffed, which was fair enough. One which stuck was Argos vans using only Sainsbury’s petrol stations to refuel.

‘The Chairman of Argos wrote to me thanking me for my ideas. Five months later, a circular [email] was sent to all Argos workers informing them of the new policy to only fill up at Sainsbury’s petrol stations, as some but not all forecourts are 24 hours.’

Mr Heslehurst wrote to a senior manager at Sainsbury’s, who informed him a large number of vehicles were now only filling up at Sainsbury’s and this had saved the business around £1.5 million.

The idea was picked up and Mr Heslehurst was given just a £10 gift voucher as a thank you, but a manager at the firm said savings would be 'about £1.5 million'

The idea was picked up and Mr Heslehurst was given just a £10 gift voucher as a thank you, but a manager at the firm said savings would be ‘about £1.5 million’

He said he was later called into the office and given a voucher of £10 as a token of thanks.

Mr Heslehurst added: ‘While the voucher was a nice gesture I was a bit irked by that because I’m a part time driver on minimum wage and I’m aware how much money the idea has saved them.’

Prior to working as a van driver, Mr Heslehurst ran his own business school, which had branches in the UK and France.

But after losing a contract with a major supplier for his business, which accounted for 70 per cent of the turnover, his marriage broke down and his wife, who is French Cambodian, left the country with their son for Cambodia.

Mr Heslehurst decided to step down from the business to try bring his son, Edward, now 14, home.

For legal reasons, he was unable to fight for custody through the courts and launched a campaign to raise awareness.

He gathered 100,000 signatures from his community and walked from Middlesbrough to London with the petition to submit it to Downing Street.

Unfortunately, nothing came of his efforts, however, two years ago, his ex-wife contacted him and he was able to bring Edward home to Britain.

Mr Heslehurst decided to take a part-time job so he could spend more time with Edward. However, as Edward is now older, Mr Heslehurst wants to ‘apply himself’ more.

Argos staff were asked to suggest cost-saving ideas to Sainsbury's chairman Mike Coupe after the takeover 

Argos staff were asked to suggest cost-saving ideas to Sainsbury’s chairman Mike Coupe after the takeover 

He said: ‘I live in a one bedroom flat and have spent the last six years sleeping on a camp bed so my son can have his own room. He has everything that he could possibly want, but I would like to have a higher position to provide for him better.

‘I was kind of hoping there would be some advancement career-wise, so I am little disappointed.

‘I really do like my job – I enjoy working there and have met some brilliant people, I just thought there was a discrepancy between £1.5 million and £10.’ 

An Argos spokesperson said: ‘We always appreciate colleague feedback. On this occasion we already had the measures which were suggested in place.’ 

The MailOnline has contacted Sainsbury’s for comment.

Last year, Sainsbury’s bought Argos for £1.4billion.

At the time, it said it wanted to create a ‘food and non-food retailer of choice’ and was hoping to draw in more shoppers by using Argos’ click and collect service.

Sainsbury’s added it wants to bolster its financial services operations and offer a ‘wider range of customer-centric services’, including credit cards, loans and insurance.

Mr Coupe said last year: ‘Our customers want us to offer more choice and for that choice to be faster than ever, driven by the rise of mobile phone and digital technology. It will enhance both businesses in the way customers respond.’

On Monday, The Daily Mail revealed Sainsbury’s is aiming to purchase convenience chain Nisa for £130m.

Money-saving ideas for heirs’ property | News | southstrandnews.com

People facing a possible sale of their property for unpaid taxes are often in a tough situation.

Theresa White, founder and executive director of a group working to help black landowners deal with heirs’ property, offered some ideas to a group of Plantersville residents.

These same ideas can be helpful to anyone who owns land and would like to reduce taxes or help find a way to earn extra money to pay those bills.

White, founder of the Pan-African Family Empowerment Land Preservation Network Inc., came to Plantersville last week to help two landowners keep or recover their property from a tax sale.

While in Plantersville, White offered a number of ideas to help people reduce their taxes. She gave out copies of several forms that are available on Georgetown County websites.

Reducing taxes

White explained several ways people can reduce their taxes, that they may not know about.

• Legal residences are taxed at a 4 percent rate, while rental or second-property homes are taxed at 6 percent. A “Special Assessment Legal Residence Application” is available from the County Assessor’s office at 129 Screven St. When required documents are submitted and approved, a 6 percent property could be changed to a 4 percent tax rate.

• If a person is permanently disabled, and can prove that disability, the owners would not have to pay taxes on a house and two cars.

• If you are 65 years old or older, you may apply for a Homestead Exemption. If the house and property are valued at less than $50,000, White said, you don’t have to pay taxes. If the property is valued higher than that, you are taxed on the value about $50,000. As an example, that means for a $75,000 house and property, you would only be taxed on $25,000 of its value.

• Vehicles with high mileage can get a reduction in tax rates.

• Installment Payment Plan: this can be applied for near the end of the year. There’s a 45-day period, from Dec. 1 to Jan. 15, when the application may be filed for the coming year. The installment plan then would allow you to pay your taxes in six payments.

“Once you get on this plan, you never go off it,” White said. “I’m working with people in Beaufort County, and with Rev. Grate here, and the National Action Network in Charleston. We are trying to help get every black person in the state on the installment plan.”

Along with these tax-saving ideas, White said, PAFEN works with other organizations that do things her group cannot do.

Working the land

This week, White will be one of the speakers at the S.C. Rural Limited Resource Landowner Symposium at Voorhees College in Denmark, which is being hosted by the Charleston-based Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation.

Tish Lynn, communications director for the center, told the Georgetown Times her organization has expanded its reach from the six counties – including Georgetown – that it had been serving to 15.

All of the counties, except Horry, are participating in both legal advice for handling heirs’ property issues and land issues. Horry and the other counties are all participating in the Center’s Sustainable Forestry and African American Land Retention Program.

White talked about that forestry and agriculture program with the people in Plantersville.

Grate said he had conversations with a man from Seattle who had seen the BBC story and video. He said once the Plantersville residents get past the current tax situation, if they seek to grow and market organic produce, he could help them organize and market their products.

Plantersville residents come from a long line of people – formerly enslaved and their descendants – who have grown their own food and timber. Renewing and expanding those kinds of activities can be an additional source of income for people.

Money made from growing and marking timber for pulpwood or lumber, and various agricultural products, White said, fit in with the heritage of the Gullah people of Plantersville and the Gullah and Geechee people and others of African ancestry throughout the state.

More information

Georgetown County Treasurer and Assessor’s offices are in the old county courthouse building at 129 Screven St. in Georgetown. Call the Assessor’s office at 843-545-3017, or visit www.gtcounty.org.

The Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation in Charleston can be reached at 843-745-7055, or www.heirsproperty.org.

The Pan-African Family Empowerment Land Preservation Network Inc., St. Helena Island can be reached at 843-812-3558, or www.panafricanfamilyempowermentnetwork.org.

Money-saving ideas for heirs’ property

People facing a possible sale of their property for unpaid taxes are often in a tough situation.

Theresa White, founder and executive director of a group working to help black landowners deal with heirs’ property, offered some ideas to a group of Plantersville residents.

These same ideas can be helpful to anyone who owns land and would like to reduce taxes or help find a way to earn extra money to pay those bills.

White, founder of the Pan-African Family Empowerment Land Preservation Network Inc., came to Plantersville last week to help two landowners keep or recover their property from a tax sale.

While in Plantersville, White offered a number of ideas to help people reduce their taxes. She gave out copies of several forms that are available on Georgetown County websites.

Reducing taxes

White explained several ways people can reduce their taxes, that they may not know about.

• Legal residences are taxed at a 4 percent rate, while rental or second-property homes are taxed at 6 percent. A “Special Assessment Legal Residence Application” is available from the County Assessor’s office at 129 Screven St. When required documents are submitted and approved, a 6 percent property could be changed to a 4 percent tax rate.

• If a person is permanently disabled, and can prove that disability, the owners would not have to pay taxes on a house and two cars.

• If you are 65 years old or older, you may apply for a Homestead Exemption. If the house and property are valued at less than $50,000, White said, you don’t have to pay taxes. If the property is valued higher than that, you are taxed on the value about $50,000. As an example, that means for a $75,000 house and property, you would only be taxed on $25,000 of its value.

• Vehicles with high mileage can get a reduction in tax rates.

• Installment Payment Plan: this can be applied for near the end of the year. There’s a 45-day period, from Dec. 1 to Jan. 15, when the application may be filed for the coming year. The installment plan then would allow you to pay your taxes in six payments.

“Once you get on this plan, you never go off it,” White said. “I’m working with people in Beaufort County, and with Rev. Grate here, and the National Action Network in Charleston. We are trying to help get every black person in the state on the installment plan.”

Along with these tax-saving ideas, White said, PAFEN works with other organizations that do things her group cannot do.

Working the land

This week, White will be one of the speakers at the S.C. Rural Limited Resource Landowner Symposium at Voorhees College in Denmark, which is being hosted by the Charleston-based Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation.

Tish Lynn, communications director for the center, told the Georgetown Times her organization has expanded its reach from the six counties – including Georgetown – that it had been serving to 15.

All of the counties, except Horry, are participating in both legal advice for handling heirs’ property issues and land issues. Horry and the other counties are all participating in the Center’s Sustainable Forestry and African American Land Retention Program.

White talked about that forestry and agriculture program with the people in Plantersville.

Grate said he had conversations with a man from Seattle who had seen the BBC story and video. He said once the Plantersville residents get past the current tax situation, if they seek to grow and market organic produce, he could help them organize and market their products.

Plantersville residents come from a long line of people – formerly enslaved and their descendants – who have grown their own food and timber. Renewing and expanding those kinds of activities can be an additional source of income for people.

Money made from growing and marking timber for pulpwood or lumber, and various agricultural products, White said, fit in with the heritage of the Gullah people of Plantersville and the Gullah and Geechee people and others of African ancestry throughout the state.

More information

Georgetown County Treasurer and Assessor’s offices are in the old county courthouse building at 129 Screven St. in Georgetown. Call the Assessor’s office at 843-545-3017, or visit www.gtcounty.org.

The Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation in Charleston can be reached at 843-745-7055, or www.heirsproperty.org.

The Pan-African Family Empowerment Land Preservation Network Inc., St. Helena Island can be reached at 843-812-3558, or www.panafricanfamilyempowermentnetwork.org.