Student finances: How to manage money at university

Colin Haywood, wealth planning director at Sanlam UK, said families should start by saving in a Junior Isa: “You can currently save up to £4,128 a year, which your child can access when they turn 18.”

Today’s best Junior Cash Isa from Coventry Building Society pays 3.25 per cent and Haywood said: “Save the full annual amount at that rate for 10 years and you will have £49,427 free of tax.”

You can use a Junior Isa to invest in stocks and shares to seek potentially greater returns, although with more risk due to market volatility. Grandparents can contribute too.

“They can gift up to £3,000 each year with the money instantly falling out of their estate for inheritance tax (IHT) purposes,” Haywood said.

Hints From Heloise: Managing your money – The Washington Post

Dear Heloise: I like to be organized, but an area I have trouble with is a big one — my finances. Do you have some hints to help?

Emily E., Boise, Idaho

Emily E.: It’s important to know where all your money is, and to know that it is behaving! Here are some hints:

● Write down all of your expenses that are the same each month: rent/mortgage, car payment, cable bill and insurance.

● Then figure the amounts for expenses that can vary: Other utility bills, groceries and credit card payments would go here.

● Then write down big, unpredictable or rare expenses you might have: Household repairs and vacations go here.

● Document all the income you have for the month. Include pay, dividends, the sale of items, refunds, etc.

Note trends in all of these areas. Soon a pattern will emerge, and you can see where you can save, and where you can spend more.

It’s important for you to stay on top of your finances. Writing a budget and accounting for all the money you have will help your bank account grow!

P.S. There are some budgeting apps and tools on the computer that you can use to help you manage your money. Find one that suits you.

Dear Heloise: When I carry liquids, lotions, creams and gels in my handbag, I always seal each container in a plastic sandwich bag. I don’t want to risk a spill or a messy, greasy cleanup.

Mary C., Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

Mary C.: I’m all for saving those handbags!

Dear Heloise: I’ve solved the problem of going to the grocery store and winding up with a shopping cart that has a wobbly wheel, pulls to one side or has a clicking noise.

I do the following: I take one or two carts back up to the store from the parking lot. This way, I can “test-drive” a cart and ensure that the cart I push around the store is a good one.

This also assists the store in rounding up carts left in the parking lot. Everyone should take in a cart or two instead of walking past and leaving them on the lot.

James A., Abilene, Tex.

James A.: Wonderful! Alert store personnel of the bad cart, and help out the cart-pushers by bringing in a cart, especially in that Texas heat!

Dear Heloise: When we go on camping trips to the mountains, I bring whistles and put them on strings and hang one around everyone’s neck when they go exploring.

I blow my whistle and wait for a return whistle — no one gets lost!

Donna in California

Dear Readers: Before traveling, call your credit/debit card company and/or bank to let them know, so they won’t flag your card for suspicious usage. This can save a lot of time.

Heloise’s column appears six days a week at washingtonpost.com/advice. Send a hint to Heloise@Heloise.com.

2017, King Features Syndicate

Super funds strategising to manage currency risk: NAB | Money …

IOOF managing director, Christopher Kelaher has confirmed his firm has a record number of acquisition moves in the market.

Managing currency risk needs new approaches in a funds management environment characterised by perpetual policy changes, pressure to grow and increasing transaction costs, according to the National Australia Bank (NAB) 2017 Superannuation FX Hedging Survey.

Regulation was the most significant factor touted in NAB’s annual hedging survey, with 30 per cent of fund respondents stating they had already upped the focus on margining and collateral.

The rise in emerging market exposure along with the drop in emerging market currency hedging had been responsible for positive fund sentiment toward changing up management strategies, according to the survey, and 70 per cent of funds had indicated consideration or implementation of transaction cost analysis to manage rising costs; three quarters of those (76 per cent) had looked to a manager of bank to provide the service.

Commenting on the findings of the survey, NAB director of fixed income currencies and commodities, Emma Lawson said funds were feeling the heat when it came to best practice management of Australians’ wealth.

“The environment in which funds operate is evolving quickly, incorporating more regulation, policy changes, pressure to grow and diversify, and technological change,” she said.

“Combine these headwinds with lower FX returns in recent times, and even lower market volatility, and you’ve got a case where super funds are adapting and responding to changing conditions.”

The survey also found most funds use an external overlay manager to implement trades, or hedges, to protect investments against the associated risks of currency exposures, with only nine per cent planning to outsource in the future.

Attention was also drawn to the importance of following Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) guidelines in the survey, which encouraged funds to seek advice from a bank or asset manager.

 

How to pick a good kids’ savings account

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According to a new survey from personal finance website GoBankingRates, nearly 7 in 10 Americans have less than $1,000 in their savings account. Sean Dowling reports.
Buzz60

 

 

Just as you wouldn’t send your kids to school without the right supplies, you wouldn’t expect them to learn about smart savings strategies without a few helpful tools.

Enter savings accounts. Although they might seem like mere parking spots for money, joint savings accounts for children can teach them about interest, fees and other important banking concepts. The joint ownership means parents manage the cash in that account until the child turns 18.

The first step, though, is finding a good account. Your best bet is likely a credit union or online bank, which tend to charge fewer fees and offer higher interest rates than big banks.

Here are a few tips for finding the best place for kids to save cash.

Ignore marketing gimmicks

A good kids’ savings account looks a lot like one you might open for yourself, with relatively high rates — think 1% and up —and no monthly fees.

Some banks offer accounts that are explicitly marketed as savings accounts for kids. Most are mediocre, carrying monthly fees and low rates while providing few educational tools. And if you decide to hold off on opening your child’s first savings account until he or she is 15 or 16, a standard account would be a better fit.

If you’re interested in tools that will help your child learn about finance, consider visiting online resources, such as those offered by MyMoney.gov, which is part of a federally backed initiative to boost financial literacy. This website offers activities that touch on topics such as money management and the basics of coins and currency, which can complement the features your savings account might offer.

Look for tools to track saving and spending

You’ll want to see your kid’s funds grow, not get eaten away by recurring fees. You’ll also want your child to track those funds and learn how to manage money.

Many online banks let you create savings goals and offer calculators to help you track the interest you earn, which can serve as a good introduction to the benefits of compound interest.

Exploring these features with your child on online bank sites can also be educational. The process of hunting down a good account highlights the values of patience and persistence when looking for money-related products, as many of the options you initially encounter might not be very good. That’s a skill your child can use in the future when selecting other financial tools, including credit cards and loans.

Consider the benefits of branches

Credit unions, meanwhile, have their own strengths: Some offer high rates on standard savings accounts, and visiting a physical branch can make the process of setting aside money more tangible.

Depositing cash into a savings account in person and then withdrawing it for a fun purchase later underscores the value of delayed gratification. The earlier children can understand that concept, the better.

Other savings options

Although savings accounts can be a good way to introduce kids to the principles of setting aside money, these products shouldn’t be the main way you save for important expenses, such as college.

For that, you’ll be better served by a 529 plan. These products are tax-free investment vehicles you can use to pay for certain higher education expenses, such as tuition and textbooks.

But when it comes to socking away your child’s allowance and letting those funds grow — however slowly — an account that limits fees and pays high rates will serve them well.

MORE:

Allowances Don’t Teach Kids About Money — You Do
Mobile Money Apps: Tech Helps Teach Kids to Save
3 Ways to Teach Kids About Money

Tony Armstrong is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. Email: tony@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @tonystrongarm.

NerdWallet is a USA TODAY content partner providing general news, commentary and coverage from around the Web. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

Hints From Heloise: Managing your money

Dear Heloise: I like to be organized, but an area I have trouble with is a big one — my finances. Do you have some hints to help?

Emily E., Boise, Idaho

Emily E.: It’s important to know where all your money is, and to know that it is behaving! Here are some hints:

● Write down all of your expenses that are the same each month: rent/mortgage, car payment, cable bill and insurance.

● Then figure the amounts for expenses that can vary: Other utility bills, groceries and credit card payments would go here.

● Then write down big, unpredictable or rare expenses you might have: Household repairs and vacations go here.

● Document all the income you have for the month. Include pay, dividends, the sale of items, refunds, etc.

Note trends in all of these areas. Soon a pattern will emerge, and you can see where you can save, and where you can spend more.

It’s important for you to stay on top of your finances. Writing a budget and accounting for all the money you have will help your bank account grow!

P.S. There are some budgeting apps and tools on the computer that you can use to help you manage your money. Find one that suits you.

Dear Heloise: When I carry liquids, lotions, creams and gels in my handbag, I always seal each container in a plastic sandwich bag. I don’t want to risk a spill or a messy, greasy cleanup.

Mary C., Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

Mary C.: I’m all for saving those handbags!

Dear Heloise: I’ve solved the problem of going to the grocery store and winding up with a shopping cart that has a wobbly wheel, pulls to one side or has a clicking noise.

I do the following: I take one or two carts back up to the store from the parking lot. This way, I can “test-drive” a cart and ensure that the cart I push around the store is a good one.

This also assists the store in rounding up carts left in the parking lot. Everyone should take in a cart or two instead of walking past and leaving them on the lot.

James A., Abilene, Tex.

James A.: Wonderful! Alert store personnel of the bad cart, and help out the cart-pushers by bringing in a cart, especially in that Texas heat!

Dear Heloise: When we go on camping trips to the mountains, I bring whistles and put them on strings and hang one around everyone’s neck when they go exploring.

I blow my whistle and wait for a return whistle — no one gets lost!

Donna in California

Dear Readers: Before traveling, call your credit/debit card company and/or bank to let them know, so they won’t flag your card for suspicious usage. This can save a lot of time.

Heloise’s column appears six days a week at washingtonpost.com/advice. Send a hint to Heloise@Heloise.com.

2017, King Features Syndicate

Super funds strategising to manage currency risk: NAB

IOOF managing director, Christopher Kelaher has confirmed his firm has a record number of acquisition moves in the market.

Managing currency risk needs new approaches in a funds management environment characterised by perpetual policy changes, pressure to grow and increasing transaction costs, according to the National Australia Bank (NAB) 2017 Superannuation FX Hedging Survey.

Regulation was the most significant factor touted in NAB’s annual hedging survey, with 30 per cent of fund respondents stating they had already upped the focus on margining and collateral.

The rise in emerging market exposure along with the drop in emerging market currency hedging had been responsible for positive fund sentiment toward changing up management strategies, according to the survey, and 70 per cent of funds had indicated consideration or implementation of transaction cost analysis to manage rising costs; three quarters of those (76 per cent) had looked to a manager of bank to provide the service.

Commenting on the findings of the survey, NAB director of fixed income currencies and commodities, Emma Lawson said funds were feeling the heat when it came to best practice management of Australians’ wealth.

“The environment in which funds operate is evolving quickly, incorporating more regulation, policy changes, pressure to grow and diversify, and technological change,” she said.

“Combine these headwinds with lower FX returns in recent times, and even lower market volatility, and you’ve got a case where super funds are adapting and responding to changing conditions.”

The survey also found most funds use an external overlay manager to implement trades, or hedges, to protect investments against the associated risks of currency exposures, with only nine per cent planning to outsource in the future.

Attention was also drawn to the importance of following Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) guidelines in the survey, which encouraged funds to seek advice from a bank or asset manager.

 

Huntersville dives into plan to make HFFA swim center profitable

The Huntersville Family Fitness and Aquatic Center has developed into a big part of the community with more than 2,500 families making up more than 8,000 members.

But in the 16-plus years since the Huntersville Family Fitness and Aquatic Center was built, the bid for managing the 88,000-square-foot facility with an Olympic-sized pool and diving well, fitness center, full court gymnasium, group exercise studios, outdoor splash park and more has never been reopened.

Davidson-based Health Works Inc., known as Health Sports Works, has been the only company to manage the facility since 2002.

However, that changed March 6 when the Huntersville Town Board of Commissioners voted to allow new companies to bid for the management contract.

After a lengthy interview process, the Huntersville commissioners decided to take a closer look at three company’s proposals, including the bids from Health Sports Works, Huntersville-based Swim Club Management Group and Sports’ Facilities Management of Clearwater, Fla.

The town board held a special meeting July 11when they voted 4-2 to negotiate with Swim Club Management Group. On July 17, at the regular meeting, the commissioners made it official, voting 4-2 to terminate the contract with Health Sports Works Sept. 3, meaning SCMG will start Sept. 4.

Mayor John Arenalla says Huntersville will not only save $125,000 on the management fee, but could also save as much $238,000 in the first year in various fees and service charges.

Town manager Gerry Vincent says their goal for the HFFA throughout the whole process was simple.

“The board’s vision was to make the 88,000-square-foot facility profitable,” said Vincent. “In years’ past, the HFFA was losing money and we had to use more funds. …

“Change is not always easy, but change is a good thing to get fresh eyes, a fresh perspective on how Swim Club Management Group can run things differently. We have to give it some time.”

The numbers

Huntersville Mayor John Arenalla says the purpose for building the HFFA in 2001 was for two reasons: first, as amenity for the residents, and second, to bring outside events that would bring more revenue into the town.

While the HFFA has had a lot of success in achieving those goals, in recent years the facility was losing money because of declining memberships and attractingfewer big events, according to Arenalla and Vincent.

We’re hoping the HFFA can get back to making money. … We also hope the HFFA can draw bigger events, swim/diving meets, and bring more money into the area, get more heads in beds.

Huntersville Mayor John Arenalla

The losses have also forced Huntersville to dip in hotel/motel tax money.

Town leaders believe the new contract with HFFA will not only save money, but allow the facility to be profitable.

SCMG will manage the HFFA for $58,000 per year, compared to the $183,000 that Health Sports Works was charging, according to Vincent.

Arenalla says Huntersville will not only save $125,000 on the management fee, but could also save as much $238,000 in the first year in various fees and service charges.

Arenalla also noted Huntersville used approximately $650,000 of hotel/motel tax money for the HFFA in 2016, and has budgeted $400,000 for the same facility in 2017.

“We believe this contract is a lot more beneficial to the taxpayers of Huntersville,” said Arenalla, 54, the mayor since November 2015 and a Huntersville resident since 1997. “Ultimately, Huntersville taxpayers loaned money to build the HFFA ($5 million dollars from reserve fund) and hasn’t paid that back.

“We’re hoping the HFFA can get back to making money, so we can use less of the tax, so that money can go to things like police, fire and sidewalks. We also hope the HFFA can draw bigger events, swim/diving meets, and bring more money into the area, get more heads in beds.”

A new energy

Swim Club Management Group is no stranger to the Huntersville area.

President/CEO Brian Sheehan grew up here and is a North Meck High 1997 graduate and UNCC 2001 graduate. he founded Swim Club Management Group in 2002 and the Huntersville-based company has now grown with 250 clients and new offices in Asheville, Raleigh and Charlottesville and Richmond, Va.

Sheehan, 38, says earning the HFFA contract was rewarding for many reasons, including “the opportunity to work with a lot of the members who are family, lifelong friends, teachers, mentors and neighbors.”

While Swim Club Management Group doesn’t officially take over until Sept. 4, they are busy working on the transition of taking over the HFFA.

One of Sheehan’s first moves came when he named Swim Club Management Group’s Director of Human Resources Zack Brown as the HFFA’s interim wxecutive director.

Brown is used to helping businesses in transition; he was part of the transition team for Cedar Fair Entertainment when the company purchased Carowinds from Paramount a decade ago.

“The only way to be successful is to have a great work ethic, and that’s allowed us to have the success we’ve had as a company the last 15 years,” Sheehan said. “We know the HFFA has a lot of great members, great employees and a lot of good things already in place.

“But, we want to breathe new life into the (HFFA) facility and then keep it going. One of our goals is to never be complacent, because if you get complacent, you aren’t going to be around long. We know we have to bring our ‘A game,” to the job, every day.”

‘Eyes and Ears Open’

Sheehan and Brown say Swim Club Management Group’s focus from day one will be “to have their eyes and ears open” to making improvements, where necessary.

That effort includes listening to not only the current members and clients, but also the HFFA employees, whom Sheehan says will all be offered employment for 90 days.

While Swim Club Management Group will bring new ideas, programs and some employees to the HFFA, they know they don’t have to come in and change everything.

“We know there a lot of employees at HFFA that have done a tremendous job for a long time and we want to make sure we rehire those people,” Brown said. “We understand we don’t have to make major changes to everything. Our goal is to have our eyes and ears open to where we need to make improvements, and where we don’t need to change what is working already.”

Moving forward

Both Sheehan and Brown say Swim Club Management Group believes a good staff will help them take better care of their current members and in turn be able to attract new members.

If they “can take care of the people in the building every day,” they believe bigger and better events will also come to the HFFA.

“Our members are our biggest priority and focus,” Sheehan said. “We definitely want to attract more of the big events for sure, because they are important to the HFFA and the town, but not at the detriment of our members.”

One of their biggest clients is SwimMAC Carolinas’ who has a multi-year contract to rent out lanes for their competitive teams, lessons and Masters’ swimmers.

SwimMAC Carolinas’ North region team, who usually has 285 to 315 members, regularly features nationally-ranked swimmers who train at the HFFA — siuch as Hough High rising senior, Will Chan and recent Christ the King graduate and Penn State University bound Jane Donahue.

Sheehan believes longtime partners like SwimMAC Carolinas, Novant Health and more will help the HFFA be a destinatio again.

“We want to truly make the HFFA a destination, and to do that you have to have partners and members that make it a place to be,” Sheehan said. “Most of our members will drove past five places with pools or five different yoga studios on their way home from work. We have to give them a reason to come to us.”

Jay Edwards is a freelance writer:jedwardsjr23@gmail.com

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Millennials are set to inherit record wealth — and the way they manage it will be unprecedented


wealthy
They don’t trust
traditional financial advisers.

Stuart
C. Wilson/Getty


• Millennials are set to inherit more than $30 trillion
from their baby boomer parents.

• This wealth transfer is a huge opportunity for
financial advisers, but they will face challenges.

• Young Americans turn to technology to manage their
money, and tend not to trust advisers. 

The hyperbolic stereotypes that surround millennials – that they are entitled,
pampered, narcissistic and suspicious of anyone besides other
millennials – fall apart once you listen to them and do your
investment homework.

Then you realize that practically from day one of adulthood, a
great many millennials have been shoved up against a financial
wall.

Take soaring student loan debt. As of June, when
the youngest millennials graduated college, it was $37,172.
That’s up more than 20 percent from 2012’s $30,000, an
astronomical figure in and of itself.

And here’s the bottom-line impact: PwC’s 2016 Employee Financial
Wellness Survey found that 42 percent of millennial employees
shoulder student loan debt, with 79 percent saying their loans
have moderate or significant impact on meeting financial goals.
Meanwhile, 63 percent of employees with student loans have saved
less than $50,000 for retirement. That’s a long, long way from
the $2 million or so they’d need to retire comfortably in 2050.

You can only imagine what this means for millennials with
part-time jobs, low-paying service jobs, or no jobs at all. And
yet baby boomers – who some would label the
original entitled, pampered, narcissistic generation – are
growing old and getting ready to pass on considerable financial
resources to their millennial progeny.

Make no mistake: This transfer of wealth will be unprecedented,
unlike anything in the last century of American history.

“More than 75 million millennials born between 1981 and 1997 are
ready to take over estimated $30 trillion in wealth from baby
boomers,” says Christopher Ma, director of the George Investments
Institute at Stetson University in DeLand, Florida.

That’s reinforced by AARP statistics, which show that people
older than 50 hold 80 percent of America’s household wealth.

Jeff Kelley, senior vice president of Westlake Ohio-based Equity
Institutional, puts it like this: “So long Woodstock. Hello
Lollapalooza.”

Addressing this transfer of wealth means tremendous opportunities
for financial advisers.

“Emphasizing how millennial investors don’t have to go it alone,”
Kelley says, “can go a long way.”

Yet other issues abound, particularly when it comes to mistrust
of the advisery industry. Older millennials, after all, watched
in disbelief as countless investors (including family members)
were fleeced by the financial chicanery that spawned Great
Recession. Many Americans who’ve since rebuilt their nest eggs
may opt for blissful ignorance. They don’t.

“The bottom line is that millennials do not trust conventional
financial advisers,” Ma says. “They were all raised in the tech
age. They believe everything can be self-taught without human
contact.”

To be sure, millennials have fed an explosion in digital robo-advisery tools such as Betterment
and Kapitall, a drag-and-drop investment site that resembles a
video game interface. And the 2017 FIS Consumer Banking Pace
Report found that over a typical 30-day period, 49 percent of
millennials used a mobile device to pay a bill, while 46 percent
transferred funds between bank accounts.

“Robos woke the industry up to the need of a full on embrace of
technology,” says Jack Sharry, executive vice president of
strategic development at LifeYield, headquartered in Boston. “For
millennials, an easy user experience is table stakes. … We are
moving from adviser-led or technology-led to the access to
advisers and easy-to-use technology.”

Sharry has a point. Robo tools mark a quantum leap forward. But
they don’t offer human advice: a tough sell for those who’d
rather text than talk, perhaps, but something millennials crave
based on survey after survey.

“Technology may help control costs and achieve diversification,
yet only human advisers can appropriately react to changing life
circumstances,” says Michaeline Gordon, a trust and estate
planning attorney with Chicago-based law firm Ginsberg Jacobs. “A
robo adviser isn’t going to respond, for example, to job
uncertainty or an illness in a family – or provide a sounding
board and objective advice about major life events.”


texting einstein smart millennials
More than half of
millennials use their cell phones to pay
bills.

REUTERS/Lucy
Nicholson


As for the boomers, quitting the day job may pale in comparison
to the big job of getting their millennial children ready.

“Boomers can help prepare their inheritors by initiating the
conversation early,” says Chris Wong, CEO of LifeSite in Mountain
View, California. “Families can start by taking stock of key
information including wills, health insurance cards and policy
numbers, in addition to financial investments and account
information.”

“For many retirement plan participants, the transfer from
contribution to distribution will be the biggest liquidity event
of their lives,” says Rick Frisbie, CEO of RobustWealth, a
digital wealth management platform in Lambertville, New Jersey.
“It’s often on the order of high six figures, even into seven
figures, has tax consequences and needs to be used for future
income and liability requirements.”

To that end, Frisbie agrees that robo advisers work well in
tandem with their human counterparts “by handling, in an
automated fashion, the rebalancing requirements of the adviser’s
clients to make sure their accounts adhere to asset allocation
and income-generating goals.”

Yet in the end, “every family’s situation is unique,” says Jared
Feldman, partner at accounting firm Anchin in New York City and
co-practice leader of the firm’s private client group. “Some
families educate children early on to better inform and prepare
them for the responsibilities of great wealth. Others feel that
they must protect their young and don’t disclose much information
to their children.”

“There is no single solution,” Feldman says. “But preparedness is
essential in case of any significant life-changing events.”

And so, much will depend upon whether millennials and/or their
parents are entitled, pampered and narcissistic – or transcend
stereotypes as they gratefully live up to the worth of wealthy
types.

With Chargers gone, Qualcomm Stadium still a big (money) loser – The San Diego Union

It takes a skunk catcher, nearly $600,000 in annual security services, dozens of city employees and an undisclosed number of contractors to keep Qualcomm Stadium functioning.

The 70,000-seat, 1.4-million-square-foot, award-winning landmark will celebrate its 50th anniversary Aug. 20. Yet there’s no birthday party listed on the events calendar for the 166-acre site.

Instead, the “Q” has lost its name — bids are due Sept. 1 to take over the expired naming rights held by Qualcomm Corp.

Its former NFL home team, now the Los Angeles Chargers, is playing its first home game of the year on Sunday, 113 miles north in a 27,000-seat soccer stadium in Carson.

Some of the world’s largest hedge funds are getting crushed


Sad trader
A
trader watches the screen at his terminal on the floor of the New
York Stock Exchange in New York October 15, 2014.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Some of the world’s largest hedge funds have lost money this
year – or made barely any – even as markets have hit record
highs.

The funds are run by firms including Bridgewater Associates, the
largest hedge fund firm in the world, and Two Sigma, one of the
fastest-growing firms.

The weak performance is especially striking, as the SP 500
has delivered 10.4% through July. In addition,
54% of active
managers outperformed their benchmark Russell 1000 index in the
first half of 2017
, according to Bank of America Merrill
Lynch. 
At this pace, they’re headed for their
best year since 2007.

To be sure, many of these funds have gotten to the size they are
due to strong performances in previous years. Still, the weak
2017 performance by some of the biggest names in the hedge
fund industry highlights the challenge facing many managers.

The HFRI Weighted Composite Index, which tracks hedge funds,
returned 4.8% this year through July.

What follows are this year’s returns for major funds, after fees.
All the figures come from private client documents reviewed by
Business Insider, unless otherwise noted. These funds
manage money for public pensions, university endowments,

sovereign wealth funds and the rich, among other big investors.

All asset figures,
unless otherwise noted, come from Business Insider’s research or
from the Hedge Fund Intelligence Billion Dollar Club ranking,
which measures firmwide hedge fund assets from the start of the
year.


Bridgewater Associates
, the world’s largest hedge
fund firm which says it has about $160 billion

  • Pure Alpha II flagship fund: -2.8% this year through July
  • Pure Alpha fund:  -1.6% this year through July
  • Major Markets fund:  -7% this year through July

One of Bridgewater’s strategies has posted gains:

  • All Weather: 6% this year through July, according to a person
    familiar with the matter. 


Two Sigma
, $30.4 billion

  • Absolute Return Macro Cayman (CTA strategy):  
     -7.19% this year through July
  • Two Sigma’s Risk Premia strategy made essentially no money in
    the first half of the year, returning 0.06%.
  • The firm’s Compass Cayman fund is down 3.8% this year through
    July 28, according to data from HSBC. 

One of Two Sigma’s funds has gained this year, however:

  • Absolute Return Cayman Fund: 1.25% in July and 6.31% this
    year through July


Maverick Capital
,
$10.5 billion

  • Maverick Fund USA: 0% through June
  • Maverick Levered: -1.7% through June

Some of Maverick’s funds have gained, however:

  • Maverick Long: 10.7% through June
  • Maverick Long Enhanced: 10.8% through June
  • Maverick Select: 4.9% through June


Greenlight Capital
$7 billion at mid-year, per
the
Wall Street Journal

  • -2.8% through June


Carlson Capital
, $10 billion. All figures through
July.

  • Black Diamond Thematic fund: -14.2% 
  • Double Black Diamond, LP:  -2.1%
  • Black Diamond Partners, LP: -3.7%
  • Black Diamond Relative Value Partners, LP:  -3.2%
  • Black Diamond Energy, LP: -6.8%

Some of Carlson’s funds have gained, however:

  • Black Diamond Arbitrage Partners, LP:  6.2% 
  • Black Diamond Mortgage Opportunity, II:  5.6%


Graham Capital
, $14.4 billion as of August, per
Business Insider reporting 

  • The firm’s flagship Tactical Trend strategy, a quantitative
    fund which manages about $5 billion, is down -2.3% after fees
    this year through July
  • Tactical Trend Capped Beta, which is a derivative of Graham’s
    flagship quant strategy, is down 15.4% after fees. Graham’s
    K4D-10V fund is down -3.03%. 
  • The Absolute Return Class A fund, which is the biggest of the
    firm’s discretionary strategies, is down -5.2% this year through
    July.


Highfields Capital
, $12.4 billion

  • The Highfields Capital IV LP fund, the firm’s biggest
    fund with about $5.6 billion, returned 1.2% for the first half
    of the year.


Balyasny
, $12.6 billion

  • Balyasny’s Atlas Global fund was basically flat through
    June, returning 0.08%.
  • Atlas Enhanced fund was also eseentially flat, returning
    0.78%.

Caxton Associates, $8 billion

  • The Caxton Global Limited Investment Limited fund lost 11%
    through August 1, according to HSBC data.