An Ohio Based Financial Planning Firm Launches Its’ New …

CLEVELAND, Aug. 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — “Cleveland Financial Groupâ„¢ was born given our affinity to Northeast Ohio, and also stemmed from our values-based culture.  Working hard, placing our clients first, and serving our community.  We are proud to serve and advise clients throughout the United States and are honored to be based in Northeast Ohio,” said Jeremy DiTullio, CFP®, Founding Partner.

Cleveland Financial Groupâ„¢ is composed of financial planners who have prodigious experience in wealth management, executive-focused planning, and sophisticated wealth transfer strategies.

Additionally, Cleveland Financial Group teams with the valuable resource of Lincoln Financial Advisors’ National Planning Center, a team of trusted and knowledgeable professionals that support planners in analyzing data, evaluating current financial strategies, examining employee benefit plans (such as stock awards  executive bonus plans) and creating customized financial plans catered to clients’ individual needs. This team of specialists is based in Cleveland, OH.

DiTullio, of Avon Lake, Ohio has been a Financial Planner since 2000 and says their team recognizes that the financial planning industry is constantly evolving.  “We work proactively to stay current with the evolving world markets, interest rates, tax and estate rules, health and other insurance programs.”  He added that their Westlake office has made a conscious effort to grow by adding independent financial planners who bring intellectual capital in all of these areas.

The group’s Westlake, OH office was established in June of 2015 with 6 professionals and has grown to 13 team members.  DiTullio is thrilled to have established and grown a distinctive presence in Northeast Ohio.  “We are proud of the work we do.  Cleveland Financial Groupâ„¢ will create a specific identity to the unbiased advice and unencumbered product offerings we provide to our clients, as well as solidifying our unique stance as a “serve first” financial planning firm.”

Cleveland Financial Group’s primary office is located at 2001 Crocker Road, Suite 400 in Westlake Ohio.  They can be reached at 440-617-6676 or online at clevelandfg.com.

Registered associates of Cleveland Financial Groupâ„¢ are registered representatives of Lincoln Financial Advisors Corp. Securities and investment advisory services offered through Lincoln Financial Advisors Corp., a broker/dealer (member SIPC) and registered investment advisor. Insurance offered through Lincoln affiliates and other fine companies. Cleveland Financial Groupâ„¢ is a marketing name for business conducted through Lincoln Financial Advisors Corp. CRN-1862282-080217

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LPL buys National Planning Holdings with eye toward 17000-advisor firm

The nation’s largest independent broker-dealer just got a whole lot bigger.

LPL Financial closed Tuesday on the purchase of National Planning Holdings, one of the largest networks of IBDs with 3,200 advisors, the firms announced. The transaction, structured as an asset purchase, has an initial price of $325 million. The overall cost of the transaction, though, could rise to as much as $508 million based on how much of NPH’s business carries over to LPL and other costs, the companies said.

LPL buys NPH

LPL and NPH parent Jackson National Life Insurance signed the deal after receiving regulatory approval. The transaction requires current NPH advisors and their client assets to join LPL’s platform, rather than integrating NPH’s, in a process slated to be completed by early next year.

“The demand for financial advice continues to grow, and the independent model is the fastest growing part of the industry,” LPL CEO Dan Arnold said in a statement. “At LPL, NPH advisors and their clients will benefit from our scale, strength and breadth of services, including the advantages of our self-clearing platform.”

Slideshow

FP50: IBDs with the largest total revenues

NPH executives and those of Prudential plc, the English company that owned NPH and still owns Jackson, confirmed the purchase and the terms in their own statement. By the end of next year, all NPH firms plan to wind down their businesses and withdraw their BD registrations, according to NPH.

The firm pledged to maintain necessary infrastructure during the transition period. NPH includes big IBD players National Planning, Invest Financial, SII Investments and Investment Centers of America, a network which amassed $909.4 million in revenue last year.

“Given the similarities in LPL’s independent model to the NPH model, we believe LPL is the ideal acquirer to ensure continuity of the quality service and support for our clients and their financial advisors,” NPH CEO Scott Romine said in a statement.

LPL plans to add the new advisors to its force of more than 14,000 advisors in two waves between now and the first quarter of 2018, according to the company. The buyer will pay no more money to the seller if less than 72% of NPH production goes onboard and up to $123 million more if 93.5% of production transfers over.

LPL expects to spend between $40 to $60 million through the middle part of next year in additional costs during the transition, including closure and transfer fees and technology. The firm paid the initial price with cash from its balance sheet.

Reports dating back to last month had identified LPL as the frontrunner to buy NPH. The IBD sector has seen widespread consolidation in recent years, with gathering momentum.

Earlier this month, a new wealth management services holding company backed by a private equity firm bought CUSO Financial Services and its sister company Sorrento Pacific Financial. Kestra Financial acquired 600-advisor firm H. Beck the following week.

After being plagued for the past several years by regulatory issues, management upheaval and a declining stock price, LPL made a splash with the big buy. Its stock surged 9% to $50 per share in after-hours trading on the news.


Tobias Salinger

CFP Board appeals for feedback on revised conduct standards

With time running out, the CFP Board is appealing to advisors for input on its newly updated standards of professional conduct.

The board will accept public comments on the revised standards through Aug. 21, before evaluating the feedback. The actual timetable for finalizing the document will depend on the comments received, according to its General Counsel Leo Rydzewski.


Jeffrey Sauers, commercialphoto.com

Among the more significant revisions, are new guidelines for providing digital advice and recommending that clients work with other professionals, such as an accountant or an attorney.

Concerning digital advice, the new standard “reflects the important role that technology plays in the delivery of professional services,” Rydzewski says. “It begins with the obligation that a CFP professional must exercise reasonable care and judgment when selecting, using or recommending any software, digital advice tool or other technology while providing professional services. The CFP professional,” he adds, “must also have a reasonable understanding of the assumptions and the outcomes that the technology employs and a reasonable basis for believing that the technology produces reliable, objective and appropriate outcomes.”

Slideshow

Fiduciary rule leads to costly changes, protests at 13 top firms

The CFP Board is also looking to increase the accountability of advisors who bring in outside professionals to augment their work with clients. The proposed standard that governs “recommending, engaging and working with additional persons” would require advisors to conduct due diligence when bringing in outside professionals and to disclose any compensation arrangements that could create conflicts of interest.

“When engaging or recommending the selection or intention of other persons to provide services, a CFP professional is required to have a reasonable basis for the recommendation based on the person’s reputation, experience and qualifications,” Rydzewski says. “The standard also talks about, when engaging a person to provide services for a client, the obligation to exercise reasonable care to protect the clients’ interests.”

Expanded fiduciary duties
Another important change in the proposed standards expands the scope of an advisor’s fiduciary duties to a client. Under the new standards, planners would be bound by fiduciary duty in all of their work with clients, even those that fall outside planning services.

“Under the proposed revised code of ethics and standards of conduct, the fiduciary duty applies to all financial advice, which is, from CFP Board’s perspective, the technically precise way of saying it applies at all times,” says Rydzewski.

The CFP Board is also proposing to reinstate its former policy that defines bankruptcy as a form of “adverse conduct” that must be handled through the board’s disciplinary process.

The board began revising its professional standards of conduct in December 2015 and issued its draft proposal in June of this year. Its professional conduct commission is comprised of CFP professionals representing various business and compensation models, individuals with regulatory experience and the consumer advocate Barbara Roper.

The CFP Board routinely investigates suspected violations of its standards. Remedies for advisor misconduct include letters of censure, suspension or loss of the CFP designation.

Voices From chemistry to compensation: 6 Cs to build client loyalty

Pop quiz: How would you prefer to spend your time?

A. Constantly hunting for new prospects and converting them to clients.
B. Doing very little marketing and instead focusing on serving highly loyal clients who give you more of their assets to manage.

Of the thousands of financial advisors I’m met and worked with over the years, there are probably fewer than 5% who would choose A. The fact is we all want ideal clients who stick with us over time and give us more of their trust and assets and who also introduce us to their affluent peers. A devoted, delighted client base is vital to creating and growing a truly exceptional practice.


John J. Bowen Jr. is a Financial Planning columnist and CEO of CEG Worldwide, a global coaching, training, research and consulting firm for advisers in San Martin, California.

What’s more, having an exceptional practice is more important than ever. Although many financial professionals will be able to earn a good living for some time to come, we are moving toward an environment where relatively few professionals earn most of the rewards. The advisory world is becoming a place where the winners might not take all, but they will take most.

BUILDING LOYALTY
Regardless of whether you focus mainly on investments or go beyond asset management to include wealth and advanced planning services, you need a loyal clientele. To get them, you need to adopt what I call the six Cs — six factors that drive client loyalty.

  • Character
  • Chemistry
  • Caring
  • Competence
  • Consultative
  • Cost-effective

There are four foundational factors: character, chemistry, caring and competence. These four core qualities work in lockstep. If wealthy clients see you as being very caring, then they are highly likely to conclude that you have character, that the chemistry between you is good and that you are quite competent.

But having a foundation of character, chemistry, caring and competence will have little impact on how clients view you when it comes to being consultative or cost-effective.

Let’s consider each one individually.

1. Character. Character entails the personal qualities clients want in their financial professionals. The three most important of these qualities are integrity, trustworthiness and dependability. When we talk to financial professionals about character, they all profess it to be important and assert that they have integrity and are trustworthy and dependable. Unfortunately, we have found that many have a difficult time communicating character to their clients.

2. Chemistry. Chemistry is the ability to be in synch with your clients. You have chemistry when you “connect” with them. You know what your clients like to talk about and you see eye to eye with them on important issues. Chemistry is something you cannot fake, which makes it vital to focus on working with people you really like and “get” on many levels. Serving only clients who are ideal for your skills and interests will help you build chemistry as nothing else can.

3. Caring. Caring is about empathy and truly knowing what is most important to your clients, and not just their financial goals and objectives. You must communicate that you really do have a good grasp on their world.

4. Competence. The more you can demonstrate and communicate your competence, the more loyal your clients become. Most clients consider their financial professionals to be exceptionally technically capable. Clients also tend to believe their financial professionals to be extremely smart. A strong sign that your clients consider you to be competent is when they believe that you are recognized as a leading expert by your peers. Thought leadership — publishing articles and white papers, getting endorsements from key influencers in your chosen client niche — does wonders for your perceived competence.


5. Consultative. Being truly consultative is the most decisive factor in creating loyal clients, regardless of business model. There are three central components:

  • Cooperative orientation. It’s not about always doing for your clients, as most prefer a more collaborative relationship.
  • Contact parameters. You build loyalty among your clients when you contact them appropriately, not just on a schedule such as a quarterly investment review.
  • Customized communications. Instead of off-the-shelf presentations, create communications that truly connect with each client.

To communicate your message effectively to clients, it is very useful to connect with them as to the benefits that you are providing.

6. Cost-effective. You may have noticed that clients are generally becoming more price-sensitive value. They are forcing many financial professionals to lower the costs of their products and services whenever they can. The truth of the matter is that this is not about cost, but value. Most wealthy clients are willing to pay without debate for high-quality financial solutions.

Clients focus on costs when their financial professionals fail to focus on value. They want their advisors to deliver cost-effective solutions. This means not only providing value, but also making your clients recognize that you are providing value.

APPLYING THE SIX IN YOUR PRACTICE
The six Cs are all in your control. You can act in ways that communicate caring, that demonstrate your competence and that help your clients see you as consultative. Consider each factor and how to seamlessly integrate it into your practice.

Regardless of whether you focus on investments, basic financial planning or more advanced planning strategies, character and caring are essential across the board. Chemistry becomes increasingly important for wealth managers who are trying to support the full range of clients’ financial issues. Chemistry and the other factors lead to greater client rapport and openness. If you’re a wealth manager offering complex planning solutions, you need this rapport to conduct more comprehensive client evaluations and identify where wealth management strategies and products can make a major difference.

The importance of being competent, consultative and cost-effective increases as you offer additional services and products.

Taken together, these characteristics attract the right affluent clients, create authentic loyalty and act as the glue that holds the advisor-client relationship together over time.

Excelling in all six of these qualities requires you to build the right systems and processes, and have the right people in place, to deliver to your clients a consistently strong experience. This demonstrates that you are exactly the right person to help them make smart choices about their wealth.


John J. Bowen Jr.

Bay City School District Superintendent Working On Long Range Financial Planning

Addressing the Bay City School District’s long term financing will  be a critical goal for new Superintendent Stephen Bigelow.

Bigelow says the district must be flexible to deal with any future scenario that  might arise.

Bigelow added the district must be able to take into account factors like employee health care costs plus birth rates and student  enrollment trends.

He’s hoping to present a formal blueprint to the school board later this fall following a discussion of the issue at Monday night’s regular monthly board meeting.

 

National Planning loses hybrid firm Compass to Securities America …

With acquisition talk surrounding its parent firm, National Planning has lost a hybrid firm managing $340 million in client assets to Securities America.

Russ and Rob Lane of Compass Financial Resources bolted after 11 years with National Planning, the broker-dealer subsidiary of National Planning Holdings, Compass’s new IBD announced this week. The practice, based in suburban Kansas City, includes 10 advisors and two additional offices in the Midwest.

Experts foresee growing consolidation among IBDs. Kestra Financial acquired 600-advisor firm H. Beck just last week, and reports of a looming purchase of National Planning’s parent have been circulating for months, with LPL Financial emerging as possible suitor. Neither firm has confirmed an imminent deal.

Securities America revenues

In moving from National Planning to Securities America, a Ladenburg Thalmann subsidiary, Compass is going from the 15th largest IBD to the 9th largest. Though Russ Lane declines to discuss National Planning’s status, he says he and his brother noticed cutbacks in back-office support from National Planning for their Olathe, Kansas-based firm.

“I felt like there was a little slippage in communication,” he says. “It was really good, and last year was not as good.”

A spokeswoman for National Planning Holdings did not respond to requests for comment.

Slideshow

Advisors on the move: 37 of the biggest recent jumps

TEACHING ABOUT PENSIONS
The brothers opened their practice in 1988 after both had spent several years as high school history teachers and coaches, Russ Lane says. Compass offers individual advisory and brokerage accounts, while the firm’s RIA, Ameritime, provides 403(b) plan services and staff pension workshops for school districts.

Ameritime serves as plan advisor for schools in nearby Lawrence and Hutchinson, where the firm has another office, as well as a consortium which works with over 50 area districts. Another advisor, former English teacher Brian Luther, expanded the business to Lincoln, Nebraska, in May 2013.

Compass, which has an office in Nebraska along with two in Kansas, officially joined Securities America on July 17, according to FINRA BrokerCheck. The logistical and cultural connection made Securities America stand out, Lane says.

The firm’s new BD has more than 2,200 advisors out of the roughly 4,400 in Ladenburg subsidiary firms nationwide. Another Ladenburg firm, Triad Advisors, grabbed an LPL team earlier this month. The stability of the parent company also played a role in the decision to join Securities, according to Lane.

“We’re in the midst now of getting the clients moved over, and that’s a chore,” he says. “I hope never to ever, ever, ever have to do it again.”


Tobias Salinger

National Planning loses $340 million firm amid sale rumors

With acquisition rumors surrounding its parent firm, National Planning has lost a hybrid firm managing $340 million in client assets to Securities America.

Russ and Rob Lane of Compass Financial Resources bolted after 11 years with National Planning, the broker-dealer subsidiary of National Planning Holdings, Compass’s new IBD announced this week. The practice, based in suburban Kansas City, includes 10 advisors and two additional offices in the Midwest.

Experts foresee growing consolidation among IBDs. Kestra Financial acquired 600-advisor firm H. Beck just last week, and reports of a looming purchase of National Planning’s parent have been circulating for months, with LPL Financial emerging as possible suitor. Neither firm has confirmed an imminent deal.

Securities America revenues

In moving from National Planning to Securities America, a Ladenburg Thalmann subsidiary, Compass is going from the 15th largest IBD to the 9th largest. Though Russ Lane declines to discuss the National Planning sale rumors, he says he and his brother noticed cutbacks in back-office support from National Planning for their Olathe, Kansas-based firm.

“I felt like there was a little slippage in communication,” he says. “It was really good, and last year was not as good.”

A spokeswoman for National Planning Holdings did not respond to requests for comment.

Slideshow

Advisors on the move: 37 of the biggest recent jumps

TEACHING ABOUT PENSIONS
The brothers opened their practice in 1988 after both had spent several years as high school history teachers and coaches, Russ Lane says. Compass offers individual advisory and brokerage accounts, while the firm’s RIA, Ameritime, provides 403(b) plan services and staff pension workshops for school districts.

Ameritime serves as plan advisor for schools in nearby Lawrence and Hutchinson, where the firm has another office, as well as a consortium which works with over 50 area districts. Another advisor, former English teacher Brian Luther, expanded the business to Lincoln, Nebraska, in May 2013.

Compass, which has an office in Nebraska along with two in Kansas, officially joined Securities America on July 17, according to FINRA BrokerCheck. The logistical and cultural connection made Securities America stand out, Lane says.

The firm’s new BD has more than 2,200 advisors out of the roughly 4,400 in Ladenburg subsidiary firms nationwide. Another Ladenburg firm, Triad Advisors, grabbed an LPL team earlier this month. The stability of the parent company also played a role in the decision to join Securities, according to Lane.

“We’re in the midst now of getting the clients moved over, and that’s a chore,” he says. “I hope never to ever, ever, ever have to do it again.”


Tobias Salinger

LPL advisors see challenges ahead

BOSTON — Advisors from LPL Financial are facing pressure on three fronts: They must adapt to quick-changing technology, comply with an uncertain regulatory structure and live with reduced fees.

The mix makes for a challenging time, advisors said at the Focus conference held earlier this month by LPL, the nation’s largest independent broker-dealer.

Technology has transformed the industry, bringing innovations such as robo-advice and tools that ease advisors’ administrative burdens and help them adjust to the Department of Labor’s fiduciary rule. Like other BDs, LPL has sought to adapt, spending $77 million in 2016 on technology designed to cut down advisors’ work through outsourcing, automation and an upcoming app.

LPL advisor headcount

Advisors with LPL join a chorus of those arguing for optimism amid tech-induced turmoil, even as they admit the difficulties moving forward.

Advisors are grappling with “so much disruption and change because what we are required to do now is so much more,” says Sarah Carlson, founder of Spokane-based Fulcrum Financial Group. She praises LPL’s new robo offering, Guided Wealth Portfolios, for helping advisors serve smaller investors like their clients’ children.

“You’ve got to take on that child, but that child has $10,000 in assets,” Carlson says. “It takes just as much effort to help someone who has $10,000 as it does to help someone who has $1 million.”

Slideshow

Robos? What robos? RIAs post big gains in Schwab study

MORPHING AND EVOLVING
Carlson and several LPL advisors speak at least once a quarter with Brad Hearn, LPL’s executive vice president for business consulting. He and other execs shared the firm’s tech plans at the conference, in a presentation marked by applause when they revealed streamlined client account statements.

“Our industry has evolved and morphed. You spend a lot of time on those non-revenue generating activities,” says Andy Kalbaugh, the firm’s divisional president for national sales and consulting. “I do think independent advisors have more challenges to work with, because they’re their own bosses.”

Advisors’ anxiety about the future has fallen in the past year, says Kalbaugh, adding that the firm is working “to give them more arrows to work with.”

LPL last month announced a no-load mutual fund platform to go with lower-cost separately managed account services and with Guided Wealth Portfolios, which is slated for launch later this month.

LPL is “meeting the challenge,” according to Albert Cavazos, the president of San Antonio-based AC Financial. He and his daughter Alexandra, a two-year employee of the firm, remain confident about advisors’ future viability, they say.

“We’re very excited about the services that we offer and the value that we can bring to our clients’ lives,” Alexandra Cavazos says. “A personal connection with an advisor is invaluable compared to technology alone.”

BEWARE CHANGES TO SOFTWARE
Lower fees have taken a toll on both the industry and LPL though, says Carlson. She notes that she now takes on training new employees herself rather than relying on any costly internal training like the three-year program she completed at the start of her career.

LPL advisors’ new ClientWorks customer management software, in the process of replacing the Internet Explorer-based Branchnet, is a “more versatile” program, according to Carlson. But not everyone will relish that shift, she says.

“There are some people who don’t embrace change easily,” Carlson says. “It’s kind of like how Microsoft changes their software and how that’s received.”


Tobias Salinger

Commonwealth Bank CEO to Retire from Scandal Plagued Lender

Commonwealth Bank of Australia CEO Ian Narev will retire from Australia’s largest lender by the end of the current financial year amid claims the bank contravened anti-money laundering and terrorism financing laws.

The Commonwealth Bank (CBA.AU) announced this morning that it had started the process of finding a replacement for Narev, who last week unveiled a AUD9.9 billion full-year profit amid public outrage at the bank’s latest…

Stacy Bush: Strategic investment planning: The basics

Why do so many people never obtain the financial independence that they desire? Often it’s because they just don’t take that first step — getting started.

Besides procrastination, other excuses people make are that investing is too risky, too complicated, too time consuming, and only for the rich.

The fact is, there’s nothing complicated about common investing techniques, and it usually doesn’t take much time to understand the basics.

One of the biggest risks you face is not educating yourself about which investments may be able to help you pursue your financial goals and how to approach the investing process.

Saving versus investing

Both saving and investing have a place in your finances. However, don’t confuse the two.

Saving is the process of setting aside money to be used for a financial goal, whether that is done as part of a workplace retirement savings plan, an individual retirement account, a bank savings account, or some other savings vehicle.

Investing is the process of deciding what you do with those savings. Some investments are designed to help protect your principal — the initial amount you’ve set aside — but may provide relatively little or no return. Other investments can go up or down in value and may or may not pay interest or dividends.

Stocks, bonds, cash alternatives, precious metals, and real estate all represent investments; mutual funds are a way to purchase such investments and also are themselves an investment.

Why invest?

You invest for the future and the future is expensive.

For example, because people are living longer, retirement costs are often higher than many people expect. Though all investing involves the possibility of loss, including the loss of principal, and there can be no guarantee that any investment strategy will be successful, investing is one way to try to prepare for that future.

You have to take responsibility for your own finances, even if you need expert help to do so. Government programs such as Social Security will probably play a less significant role for you than they did for previous generations. Corporations are switching from guaranteed pensions to plans that require you to make contributions and choose investments.

The better you manage your dollars, the more likely it is that you’ll have the money to make the future what you want it to be.

What is the best way to invest?

Get in the habit of saving. Set aside a portion of your income regularly. Automate that process if possible by having money automatically put into your investment account before you have a chance to spend it.

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Though asset allocation and diversification don’t guarantee a profit or ensure against the possibility of loss, having multiple types of investments may help reduce the impact of a loss on any single investment.

Focus on long-term potential rather than short-term price fluctuations.

Ask questions and become educated before making any investment.

Invest with your head, not with your stomach or heart. Avoid the urge to invest based on how you feel about an investment.

Before you start

Organize your finances to help manage your money more efficiently. Remember, investing is just one component of your overall financial plan. Get a clear picture of where you are today.

What’s your net worth? Compare your assets with your liabilities. Look at your cash flow. Be clear on where your income is going each month. List your expenses. You can typically identify enough expenses to account for at least 95 percent of your income.

If not, go back and look again. You could use those lost dollars for investing. Are you drowning in credit card debt? If so, pay it off as quickly as possible before you start investing.

Establish a solid financial base: Make sure you have an adequate emergency fund, sufficient insurance coverage, and a realistic budget. Also, take full advantage of benefits and retirement plans that your employer offers.

Understand the impact of time

Take advantage of the power of compounding. Compounding is the earning of interest on interest, or the reinvestment of income. For instance, if you invest $1,000 and get a return of 8 percent, you will earn $80.

By reinvesting the earnings and assuming the same rate of return, the following year you will earn $86.40 on your $1,080 investment. The following year, $1,166.40 will earn $93.31. (This hypothetical example is intended as an illustration and does not reflect the performance of a specific investment).

Use the Rule of 72 to judge an investment’s potential. Divide the projected return into 72. The answer is the number of years that it will take for the investment to double in value. For example, an investment that earns 8 percent per year will double in nine years.

Consider whether you need an expert

If you have the time and energy to educate yourself about investing, you may not feel you need assistance. However, for many people — especially those with substantial assets and multiple investment accounts — it may be worth getting expert help in creating a financial plan that integrates long-term financial goals such as retirement with other, more short-term needs.

Review your progress

Financial management is an ongoing process. Keep good records and recalculate your net worth annually. This will help you for tax purposes, and show you how your investments are doing over time. Once you take that first step of getting started, you will be better able to manage your money to pay for today’s needs and pursue tomorrow’s goals.

Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. Bush Wealth Management and LPL Financial are separate entities.

Stacy Bush is with Bush Wealth Management.

LaShaunda Jordan is the business reporter at The Valdosta Daily Times. She can be contacted at (229)244-3400 ext. 1257.